It matters that people have a way to use the latest findings in psychology beyond buying a pill for depression. It matters that people have a way of looking at their lives that lets them ask the big questions and determine how they want to live – and that this is supported by therapists and mental health professionals.

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Photo by NASA/SDO.
This essay is the first of two, comprising an article that will be concluded in my next contribution to the New Existentialists. In my Existential-Humanistic Psychotherapy courses, upon encountering concepts of existential philosophy and psychology for the first time, some of my more religious students become ensnared in and troubled by their perception that existentialism threatens religion and spirituality. Those whom Mick Cooper (2003) has called the American Existential therapists certainly do, at least, appear to “debunk” any...
The first World Congress on Existential Psychology is coming up, in London, England. The editor oft New Existentialists, a certain Sarah Kass, has made sure our blog and our writers are represented there. Our topic of conversation: existentialism, writing, and activism. I feel out of place helping to represent the cause or representing causes. All...
Photograph by Steve Ryan.
I find it ironic that the day I was asked to interview for an internship with a women’s homeless work program, I was also notified that our lease was not going to be renewed. I am now homeless too. I can go to my interview and say, with all honesty, I know how the clients of the program feel. I currently face the dilemma of finding...
Welcome to the Existential Roundup, where we bring you links to some articles currently trending that may be of interest to those in the existential-humanistic psychology community. This week, we will explore social media and psychology. Technology and social media certainly have advantages. They allow us to stay connected with friends and loved...
Miryam and Dad.
Dad, I would like to say a few words on this occasion of your 90th birthday. Tolstoy begins his great novel Anna Karenina with this famous opening line: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” A couple of sentences you could spend a lifetime pondering without quite figuring it out. Still, I think...
This past weekend, I had the pleasure of learning how other species cope with difficult births. I also had to learn that even goats can suffer trauma. They can also be resentful if they think they have had their options removed. My goat, Honey, labored for several hours while making it loudly known to my whole family (and probably the entire...

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